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  1. #1

    Default Do you take different gear depending on whether you're

    hiking popular, well-used trails versus more remote, seldom-used ones? What are the differences in what you carry?

  2. #2

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    if im going someplace im not familiar with, map and compass are essential, and ill usually pack an extra meal or two to allow for an extra day due difficult terrain i didnt anticipate.
    i always bring a map and compass, except on dayhikes on familiar trails.

  3. #3
    Trail miscreant Bearpaw's Avatar
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    Simplest answer, yes. Mostly clothing. I tend toward long pants and shirts until I know how brushy a trail is. Also shy away from poncho in potentially heavy brush areas.
    If people spent less time being offended and more time actually living, we'd all be a whole lot happier!

  4. #4

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    Heavyfoot...I can't imagine you'd bring much different as whether or not you're on a used vs seldom used trail a map and compass are essential and an extra day of food never hurts either - you never know what can happen anywhere. If you don't normally carry a whistle maybe not a bad idea to add one. Just because you're on a well used trail doesn't mean you're safer. I have always tried to go to areas that are seldom used as it enhances the wilderness experience. Have fun and explore but do it safely.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by heavyfoot View Post
    hiking popular, well-used trails versus more remote, seldom-used ones? What are the differences in what you carry?
    I don't bring Monopoly Deal if I'm going someplace remote.

  6. #6

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    Yeah, I'll leave the backgammon pieces at home. The board is always with me (drawn on my sleeping pad)
    The rest is the same although if one of them is the AT, I don't normally carry a map.
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

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    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    All depends on the trip, who it is with, how long and so on.

    By myself (more mileage, less time spent in camp) I tend to take more minimal gear. No stove or cook pot, no clothing for camp (I am diving into my bag almost right away) and so on.

    When backpacking with some buddies, I may take a stove and a creature comfort or two. The mileage is not as high, but the emphasis is not on camping either.

    Next weekend I am taking off with my buddy and his son for Avery's first backpacking trip (should be fun..seriously!). We are only going in 3-4 miles, but we are packing in treats, I am schelpping both my share of a 3 person free standing tent (called, no word of a lie, The Taj!) , a pocket size wildflower book to point out all the wildflowers, and finally some treats for Dad and myself in the form of two cans of beer.
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    The only thing I do differently is carry a PLB here in Australia cause its quite normal to see deadly snakes on a daily basis in certain parts of Australia, sometimes 2-3 times in one day, and they are not pit vipers but 'elapids' so it's just a different level of consequence if bit.

    I sometimes carry a PLB in New Zealand as many remote trails do not have bridges over creeks and it's not unheard of for hikers to get pinned down between impassible creeks in periods of heavy rain.

    I bring chaf cream every single time!!!!!

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    Registered User Driver8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stranger View Post
    The only thing I do differently is carry a PLB.
    What is a PLB?

    To the OP, I'm starting to pack lighter for day hikes in well-trafficked areas, maybe as well for overnights in such areas. There is value in a lighter load, no doubt. On a longer trek in more remote areas, I'd be inclined to err on the side of caution.
    The more miles, the merrier!

    NH4K: 21/48; N.E.4K: 25/67; NEHH: 28/100; Northeast 4K: 27/115; AT: 124/2191

  10. #10

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    I just change my first aid a little bit and bring a compass if its unfamiliar terrain!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Driver8 View Post
    What is a PLB?
    Personal Locator Beacon - adapted from rescue beacon technology used on boats; similar to a SPOT but (in the USA at least) uses the government satellite system as opposed to a commerial satelite system

    I bring a PLB when I do solo bushwhacking in the Whites. I also bring it on all winter backpacking trips, even if on well traveled trail with a large group [cause winter is a whole different kind of thing]

    I always ask myself, "what would happen if I broke my ankle or hit my head or was somehow immobilized?", could I expect someone happen any time soon? would I have enough food/water/shelter to wait for that to happen? would someone back home know when (and who) to call to start a search? would they know which trails to search? I don't consider celll phones to be adequate emergency gear.

    Last year, a trail runner in VT died after being immobilized and hypothermic about three miles from the trailhead on a well marked trail. So bad stuff can happen anywhere on a trail.

  12. #12

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    My gear variations are mostly for trip length, location, goals, and weather. I might be more apt to go with a smaller tarp and no bear bagging system on well traveled trail like the AT due to the frequency of shelters/bailout options. I could easily forgo a map in this scenario as well but I like them. If lucky enough (which I haven't been) to be doing a long and truly remote trip (ie Alaska) where improvements are non-existent and there is a slim to none chance of seeing others I would probably take a PLB and more significant first aid kit as well as other situational gear(bear spray)

  13. #13

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    I'm more likely to bring a folding saw on seldom used trails, as these often have fallen trees that need cutting off the trail.

  14. #14

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    My biggest changes are dependent on the season and deal mostly with clothing, sleeping pad and sleeping bag. Usually I carry more substantial food in winter also.

    geek

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    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    I will hike familiar trails with water bottle and a few essentials up to 15 miles. Unfamiliar gets a lightweight pack and everything for an overnight in the woods.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  16. #16
    NOBO toBennington, VT plus 187 mi in MH & ME
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    Of course I do. How can you be a self-respecting gear **** without changing gear??
    <G>
    Grinder
    AT hiker : It's the journey, not the destination

  17. #17
    Registered User q-tip's Avatar
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    The only thing different is clothes. I am packing an additional 1.5 lbs of clothes for the Colorado Trail as opposed to my AT kit. Everything else the same.

  18. #18

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    Yep,I pack different,if it's gonna be raining and constantly wet with higher temps,then ventilation is the key.No wind,I bring the poncho,rain and wind,rain jacket with pit zips for ventilation.Hot summer,No Clouds,white poly T-shirt.Again rain and muddy conditions,gortex boots.Stream crossings non gortex trail runners.Cool fall nights Fleece vest.I am afforded these choices as I am a "Day hiker"and a "Weekend Warrior"

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    Thanks for all the reports guys, nice to hear that.


  20. #20
    Registered User theinfamousj's Avatar
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    If I'm hiking a less populated trail, I will bring an additional piece of safety signaling equipment (namely a borrowed PLB), as on a more populated trail my safety whistle will attract all the attention I need, should I experience a catastrophe and need to be evacuated. Also, when on a less populated trail, I leave my additional orikaso mug at home that I usually carry in the frame sheet on a more populated trail because there are more sharing opportunities with more people around and invariably someone won't have an additional food/beverage vessel to put their share food in to.

    On a trail unfamiliar to me, I will bring an additional 1 L platy beyond what I'd bring for a trail I am familiar with, and will hike with it until I convince myself that I'm really and truly carrying too much water. Sure, there are water reports, but I'm one of those people who cannot just trust and has to see for herself where water is concerned.

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