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  1. #1
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    Default Weather and Temp variations

    Hey y'all,

    In general, I don't pay enough attention to the temperature. Most of my hikes are day hikes. However, I'm looking to do an overnight coming up. My previous overnights have been in some warmer weather. It currently says it might be as low as 44 degrees at night in Troutdale near where I'm going to be hiking.

    My question is, for those of you who pay close attention, if it says 44 degrees, how much lower is it typically in the higher elevations. Is there any kind of good standard to bo by when predicting tempuratures (like "it's always 2 degrees colder per 500 ft of altitude" or something like that)?

    Any input appreciated,
    Thanks,
    Dan Perkins (alphaPig)

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Ender's Avatar
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    If I remember correctly (and I very well may not be remembering correctly), I think the general rule is a 5* loss per every 1000' of elevation. Give or take.
    Don't take anything I say seriously... I certainly don't.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ender View Post
    If I remember correctly (and I very well may not be remembering correctly), I think the general rule is a 5* loss per every 1000' of elevation. Give or take.
    Yeah, something like that. However, there are several variables. Wind can be a big factor, as it mixes up the air. That can keep it warmer, but you'd not know it due to wind chill. On a calm night, it can get colder in the valleys than higher up, as cold air sinks. Rain or fog can be a factor in making it feel a lot colder.

    If the forcast is for 44*, I'd want my sleep system to keep me warm down to at least 32.
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  4. #4

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    I remember some numbers from this summer. It was 105F in Knoxville and 80F on Mt LeConte at over 6,000 feet. One time I was camping on Hangover Mt (5,000 feet) at -10F and it was -22F on Mt LeConte. But if it's 44F you don't really have to worry about temps above 5,000 feet since it won't get much lower than 20F in that case. The problem is when it's 10F in Roanoke and you're -15F on Mt Rogers.

  5. #5

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    www.mountain-forecast.com

    Type in which mountain is closest and get a six day forecast at different elevations. Includes wind and wind chill forecasts.

  6. #6
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    3.5 degrees to 5 degrees per 1000 feet, except it is very common for temps to rise as elevation increases, especially in winter, due to cold air settling in valleys (inversion).

    For cold weather, worst case scenarios, I'll use 5 degrees so I'm sure I have enough sleeping bag to sleep comforatbly.

  7. #7
    Registered User Old Hiker's Avatar
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    Old Hiker
    AT Hike 2012 - 497 Miles of 2184
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