Poll: what should I do for hammock insulation?

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  1. #1

    Default speer +nest or pod?

    I have a homemade speer type hammock. I want some warmth under me now that the weather is getting colder. I don't want to mess with down and make my own- so:

    I was wondering why no body seems to mention using a 'nest' type thing (Jacks R Better) on a speer hammock.

    (Peapod on a hennesy would be insane)

    Any specific Reasons? What do you think I should do?

    thanks

    titanium_hiker
    just call me TH
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  2. #2
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    i use a pad from walmart cost 14.99 it is 24 inches wide trimmed down 40 inches to long 10.5 oz weight,it doubles as the from in my pack,it 1/8 in closed cell and .75 in open cell,i love it.it works for me neo

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    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker
    I have a homemade speer type hammock. I want some warmth under me now that the weather is getting colder. I don't want to mess with down and make my own- so:

    I was wondering why no body seems to mention using a 'nest' type thing (Jacks R Better) on a speer hammock.

    (Peapod on a hennesy would be insane)

    Any specific Reasons? What do you think I should do?

    thanks

    titanium_hiker
    they are great products,but to heavy,bulky and not cost effective for me neo

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    Just the thread for me!

    I bought a Hennessey, then started looking for ways to insulate at about the time I started making my own gear. The first thing I made as a Speer-type hammock from Walmart bargain bin material. When I was comparing the different ways to insulate, I realized that the PeaPod couldn't be used on a Hennessey, but the JRB could be used on either. So that's what I bought!

    FWIW, my homemade Speer is MUCH more comfortable than the BP UL A-sym (and I'm only 5'10"), so most of my sleeping has been in a Speer-type with the JRB 3-season set, just like you asked, and it's worked great. A few adjustment tricks since it doesn't have the side pullouts, but no problem at all. I've been in the snow with the Nest and No Sniveller on bottom and a bag inside as a quilt.

    I haven't used a PeaPod so I can't compare performance, but I'm happy with my JRB.

    Jeff

  5. #5

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    has anyone got anything to say about the over insulation thing with the pea-pod?

    thanks for the responses so far.

    titanium_hiker
    just call me TH
    woman with altitude

  6. #6

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    oh yeah, I voted for "nothing, freeze" so I could see the poll results when viewing this thread.
    currently I use a fleece under/poncho which is nice but bunches up and a summer only type thing.

    With the winter (southern hemisphere) coinsiding with my long school break, I am looking at something nice and warm.

    titanium_hiker
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    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker
    With the winter (southern hemisphere) coinsiding with my long school break, I am looking at something nice and warm.
    If you want something cheap, warm and easy to make, check out the Ray Garlington's setup: Taco with Bag o' Feathers...

    http://www.garlington.biz/Ray/SilkHammock/

    Well, it's not so cheap if you use silk and high quality down, but it's a lot cheaper than some other options and you can substitute cheaper materials.

    I voted for JRB Nest in case that wasn't clear...

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    I can probably weigh in on this with some degree of experience since I happen to have both types of hammocks and both a Peapod and a JRB Nest. My vote was for the Peapod, but I think that you'd find either one satisfactory. Here is what I have found and what I do. . .

    When I am backpacking, I will use the one insulator designed for the hammock that I decide to take. I'll often opt for one hammock or the other based on subtle differences, expected weather, or just what mood I happen to be in. When I take my Speer Hammock, I take my down Peapod. When I take my HH, I take the JRB Nest. Both of these work great, with no other insulator except for a down top blanket (Speer), at temps to the low 30's (or below?), if I am also wearing reasonably warm clothing (fleece jacket, fleece hat, etc.).

    It should be noted that for moderate spring and fall weather my hammock set-up of choice in my HH BP UL with the tarp removed and replaced with the larger Speer tarp and the JRB Nest and Speer top blanket.

    When car camping, and bulk is not an issue, if the temps are expected to be in the 30's or below, I always choose the Speer Hammock and bring BOTH the Peapod and the JRB Nest. With this double insulation I am toasty warm, without wearing several layers, at least to the upper 20's (that is the coldest I have tried, but I am sure it would be warm lower).

    I LOVE both my Peapod and my JRB Nest, and highly recommend both, but given that you have a Speer hammock, I think that you'd be better off with the Peapod.

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    Default Need skins!

    I've got the HH for an October hike on the Long Trail in Vermont but have not yet decided on insulation either.

    I'd love to get the JRB setup but thanks to some sort of patent dispute with Tom Hennessey, JRB apparently can't sell the Python Skins anymore. Having used the snake skins, I really, REALLY would not want any hammock setup without skins.

    I'm not much of a make-it-yourself kinda guy and I don't want to buy a sewing machine so right now I'm in limbol

    Has anyone here tried the HH with their supershelter? I've read some reviews but I'd like to hear from people here. How good is it? Do the SnakeSkins cover that too?
    Last edited by JoeHiker; 05-19-2005 at 11:37.

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    I would think that since the PeaPod is designed by Ed to go with his system, that this would be the better way to go. Maybe Peter Pan or Smee can comment on people using their quilt with the Speer hammock.

    I used the under part of the new super shelter from Hennessy this last weekend with all three pads and froze up. But, after reading some stuff, maybe I wasn't supposed to use it in 45F weather?
    SGT Rock
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    Quote Originally Posted by SGT Rock
    I used the under part of the new super shelter from Hennessy this last weekend with all three pads and froze up. But, after reading some stuff, maybe I wasn't supposed to use it in 45F weather?
    Yikes! I guess JRB really is the right choice then. Mid-October temperatures in the Green Mountains can drop a lot lower than that at night.

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    As I understand it, the underpad is about 1/4" open cell foam and Hennessey markets it as a solution down to 50F. His website is the only place I've ever seen a claim that this amount of insulation is sufficient to 50F, even with a sil windblock.

    You might check www.backpackgeartest.org for some detailed reviews of each system.
    Last edited by Just Jeff; 05-19-2005 at 20:04.

  13. #13

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    thanks for all the responses. Lots of people have mentioned that since I have a speer hammock (and I love it) I should go with the PeaPod. But no one has mentioned WHY.
    for thread integrity (use in the future as a resource) please post it, I know I could stop being a lazy bum and look it up, but I want to hear some user reasons why.

    What about condensation in the speer?

    thanks for the alternate options, Jeff.

    mmm. food for thought.
    titanium_hiker
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    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker
    <snip> Lots of people have mentioned that since I have a speer hammock (and I love it) I should go with the PeaPod. But no one has mentioned WHY.
    for thread integrity (use in the future as a resource) please post it, I know I could stop being a lazy bum and look it up, but I want to hear some user reasons why.

    <snip>
    Well, size and design would be my reasons. The Peapod is designed to be the right length to completely cover a Speer hammock from one end to the other. The JRB Nest is designed to fit very nicely under the asymetrical cut of the HH. I have not measured, but I think that the Speer hammock is slightly longer than the HH also.

    The Peapod is designed for top entry. The JRB nest has a velcro slit (with really cool 2-sided velcro BTW) to accomodate the HH bottom entry. True enough, the JRB nest in no way impedes top entry, but it is designed very well with features for the HH (the slit, the ASYM design, the loops for the side ties, etc) that are just not necessary for the Speer design.

    Bottom line is that either will keep you warm, and you will not be disappointed either way you go, IMO. If you think that you may someday switch to a HH, then get the JRB Nest, since it will work with both. However, if you are happy with the Speer and don't expect to change, why not go with the solution designed for the hammock that you have.

  15. #15

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    hmmm.

    I really like the peapod idea. at the moment the cost exceeds my monthly uni living allowance so I might look into somthing homemade. Garlington's site makes down sound easy (ha! we'll see) I like the idea of sealing the peapod over me

    titanium_hiker
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  16. #16

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    down- how much is enough for a peapod? and what else do I need? does Ed Speer sell / release patterns for a peapod? Or instructions?

    titanium_hiker
    just call me TH
    woman with altitude

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    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker
    But no one has mentioned WHY.
    The JRB Nest is lighter, compresses smaller, and is more versatile than the PeaPod...and not as expensive if you only get the underquilt.

    The features that make it so adaptable to the HH also make it work well on the Speer-type. The only feature I don't use when I put it on my Speer are the ladder-loops for the side tie-outs, and I've thought of adding a button to attach them to. I don't think it's necessary, though.

    FWIW, if I were only buying one underquilt to use on a Speer, I'd get the No-Sniveller instead of the Nest. You can use either quilt under either hammock type, though. You can now buy an attachment kit separately, too.

    Also, I see no reason to carry the weight and bulk to insulate parts of the hammock that I'm not laying on, which is what the PeaPod does by encasing the entire hammock. It does a great job of cutting the wind at the ends of the hammock, but so does my Hammock Sock.

    That's just me...I'm certainly not saying my way is right or that the PeaPod isn't a good product. And Ed and the Jacks are all very nice people...you can email them directly and they'll answer whatever questions you have.

    Like Trippclark said, either will do a great job of keeping you warm. I almost dropped the money on a PeaPod at Hot Springs, actually...I was gonna have a Nest underneath, a No Sniveller inside, and a PeaPod around! Couldn't justify the money at the time, though... (Sorry, Ed!)

    If you want to make your own underquilt out of synthetic insulation, check out this design:
    http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/Ho...dsHammock.html.

    If you really like the thought of being completely surrounded, check out Risk's TravelPod or my Hammock Sock (a mod of Risk's Pod). Very simple to make and I measured 10+ degrees of warmth earlier this month on the Foothills Trail (http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/FTDay1.html). Risk used his when he went to 0 F or below, IIRC.

    Closing the novel now...enjoy your experimenting!
    Last edited by Just Jeff; 05-19-2005 at 20:38. Reason: fixed links

  18. #18
    Section Hiker, 1,040 + miles, donating member peter_pan's Avatar
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    Since Sgt Rock asked.

    First the JRB Nest and No Sniveller Under quilts were designed for HH and all other hammocks... We have not found a hammock that they will not fit. In fact every report we have seen has happy owners whatever their hammock choice...

    The Nest has a slit with Omni Tape ( no snag Velcro) that marries up to a HH for true convience.... The slit can be closed on itself thus enabling the Nest to be used on any hammock....Understand that although the HH has asym side pullouts and an asym bug net it has a rectangular bottom as do most hammocks...The Nest can also be used as a comforter on a twin bed worn as a parka length vest, formed with a foot sack and used as an overquilt inside the hammock, or on the ground. ( one use at a time naturally).

    The 78 inch length provides good over the head to beyound the feet and up the soles coverage for users up to about 6-4/6 when factoring in the diagonal sleep position....Within each baffled section the down is shiftable so loft far beyond the baffle height of 1.5 inches is achievable under the sleeper ( 2-2.5)...For straight sleeping models such as the M1965 Jungle hammock and other commercial narrow bottom hammocks the coverage is great on the bottom and sides and effectively provides for sleeper up to about 6-2...if a pillow ( clothes bag)is used under the head the shoulders will be wrapped in coverage lengthwise for up to the 6-4/6 sleeper.

    The Nest weighs 20.5 oz, including a 20+ percent overstuff. It is nice , but then I'm biased.

    For detailed tips and tricks of these underquilts and hammock camping in general recommend the Articles on our site.

    Pan
    ounces to grams
    WWW.JACKSRBETTER.COM home of the Nest and No Sniveler underquilts and Bear Mtn Bridge Hammock

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by peter_pan
    Since Sgt Rock asked.

    First the JRB Nest and No Sniveller Under quilts were designed for HH and all other hammocks... We have not found a hammock that they will not fit. In fact every report we have seen has happy owners whatever their hammock choice...
    Thanks Pan. I'll give a plug for the No Sniveler, my favorite, but then again I haven't added the overfill, so mine only weighs 18 ounces.
    SGT Rock
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  20. #20

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    I'm short. 5 foot some, so length doesn't really have much of an issue for me. Thanks for all the replies, guys. Its been really helpful.

    Pan- any reason to not have the quilt go around the hammock like the pea pod? Or is that just because primarily its for a hennesy and they have attached nets?

    I'm the type of sleeper that loses my sleeping bag over the edge of the hammock - it would be nice to have something (be it peapod or sock or hammock pants) closed at the foot end so I wouldn't get cold.

    I like the idea about down compressing- there was a lot of discussion regarding down vrs synthetic about sleeping bags a while ago- and I like the idea of down. However your homemade underquilts look pretty darn cool, Jeff.

    BTW Jacks- the website is well designed and helpful. if I had the cash I would probably dish out for a nosniveler or a nest. sorry I can't purchase one right now.

    titanium_hiker
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