Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1

    Default GIS project ideas

    I am currently studying Geographic Information Systems and had to change term project ideas at the last minute. I am looking at doing something involving the Shenandoah Park, but am kind of stumbling on potential issues or problems to analyze with GIS. Any suggestions or ideas are greatly appreciated since my back is against the wall with time and really need to get rolling.

    Thanks,
    Jake

  2. #2

    Default

    Consider placing buffers around the trail and examining land classification type. It would be particularly useful if you could incorporate some historical data--temporal change. This might work better outside of a National Park area where there might be greater changes due to private ownership.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-29-2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    391

    Default

    Gotta know what data layers you have to play with besides the usual DEMs and DRGs. Are you going to do any data collection yorself?

  4. #4

    Default

    Hi
    I should clarify...In my project, I need to be addressing an issue or problem. Proposing new parts of trails for example, something to take action in, things along those lines. I can go out and collect some data, I do have a GPS unit that can transfer spatial data collected to the GIS on my laptop. I have very little data on the trail itself, but am sitting on over 500 mbs of data on Shenandoah Natl Park. I am still going through it all, but it includes boundary data, land classification, and trail locations.

    I appreciate y'alls time...

  5. #5

    Default

    Time may be short but another option might be to look at the Great Eastern Trail. It is not currently complete so there might be a section where you could attempt to route it.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-29-2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LIVERMON View Post
    Hi
    I should clarify...In my project, I need to be addressing an issue or problem. Proposing new parts of trails for example, something to take action in, things along those lines. ..
    I assume you have soil data. Take a look at one or more trails...maybe the AT only...whatever sized project you want to make it. Overlay trail corridor onto highly erosive soils, or highly compactable soils, (identified by soil types in your soil survey or from local or regional soil person). Overlay this with steep slopes (which you can calculate using the DEMs based on whatever criteria you choose) and maybe also overlayed with steep trail profiles. Thus, you can identify areas where you have steep hillsides, with steep trail profiles, with highly erosive soils...which might idicate areas where trail relocations might be beneficial. Certainly these might be places to groud-verify.

    You could then "test" your model by going out and sampling "x" number of randomly selected areas to see if your model is working. Take some pictures which you can then georeference in your final report. Show washed out trail, stream-like water flowing down trail, etc.

    You could continue this project by then suggesting alternate routes. I'm not sure if this could be modeled or if you would just manually digitise these routes based on soil types, DEM's, and maximum desired trail slope.

    Finally, based on your ground truthing and modeling, you might consider prioritizing these suggested reroutes, using whatever criteria you and your local trail people might come up with.

    Your final report, besides listing proposed projects with miles of old trail, miles of new trail, perseived benefits, etc., could even take it further (using local data) and estimate costs, person-hours, etc. Report would have to include an electronic map of proposed relo's with as many pop-up georeferenced photos as you can muster just to add a little wow factor.

  7. #7

    Default

    This is a bit late, but I would just add that it would be nice if you could do some analysis rather than simply displaying data layers. So much GIS is glorified drafting, but it is capable of so much more like answering interesting questions that we need answers for and can't get them any other way.

  8. #8
    Registered User Tree Nerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-10-2012
    Location
    Green, Ohio
    Age
    29
    Posts
    352

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pyroman53 View Post
    I assume you have soil data. Take a look at one or more trails...maybe the AT only...whatever sized project you want to make it. Overlay trail corridor onto highly erosive soils, or highly compactable soils, (identified by soil types in your soil survey or from local or regional soil person). Overlay this with steep slopes (which you can calculate using the DEMs based on whatever criteria you choose) and maybe also overlayed with steep trail profiles. Thus, you can identify areas where you have steep hillsides, with steep trail profiles, with highly erosive soils...which might idicate areas where trail relocations might be beneficial. Certainly these might be places to groud-verify.

    You could then "test" your model by going out and sampling "x" number of randomly selected areas to see if your model is working. Take some pictures which you can then georeference in your final report. Show washed out trail, stream-like water flowing down trail, etc.

    You could continue this project by then suggesting alternate routes. I'm not sure if this could be modeled or if you would just manually digitise these routes based on soil types, DEM's, and maximum desired trail slope.

    Finally, based on your ground truthing and modeling, you might consider prioritizing these suggested reroutes, using whatever criteria you and your local trail people might come up with.

    Your final report, besides listing proposed projects with miles of old trail, miles of new trail, perseived benefits, etc., could even take it further (using local data) and estimate costs, person-hours, etc. Report would have to include an electronic map of proposed relo's with as many pop-up georeferenced photos as you can muster just to add a little wow factor.
    +1, I couldnt say it better.....this is pretty much exactly what I did for my final GIS project two years ago, except mine was creatating an ATV cross country race track....I hope it turned out well.....post your final project on here.
    Transcend the Bull$hit

  9. #9
    Registered User aclawrence's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-11-2013
    Location
    Florence, AL
    Age
    38
    Posts
    24

    Default

    When suggesting alternate routes you could incorporate a cost path analysis to help find the optimal routes. I combined a site suitability and cost path analysis for my final project a few weeks ago. I thought about doing some kind project with our local Bankhead National Forest and hiking trails but the idea came a little to late. Good Luck.

  10. #10
    Registered User aclawrence's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-11-2013
    Location
    Florence, AL
    Age
    38
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Sorry, not to hijack this thread but have any of you above found any enjoyable jobs using GIS. I just graduated and am on the job hunt. I would love to find someway to combine the outdoor stuff with GIS as opposed to sitting on the computer all day. Of course I'm sure that's what we would all love. A friend of mine just got a pretty cool job doing environmental impact stuff for people buying timberland tracts or something to that effect. It sounded pretty cool.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-29-2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aclawrence View Post
    Sorry, not to hijack this thread but have any of you above found any enjoyable jobs using GIS. I just graduated and am on the job hunt. I would love to find someway to combine the outdoor stuff with GIS as opposed to sitting on the computer all day. Of course I'm sure that's what we would all love. A friend of mine just got a pretty cool job doing environmental impact stuff for people buying timberland tracts or something to that effect. It sounded pretty cool.
    If you're willing to move then there are many jobs in GIS working for federal land management agencies (Park Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management). In these you can almost always come up with "reasons" you need to "visit the field" periodically. All state and many local agencies also have GIS to one degree or another. PM me if you need help getting started in your job search. I know 100's of GIS people (literally). Of course knowing people is not important. Jobs are tough to find no matter how many people one knows.

  12. #12
    Registered User aclawrence's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-11-2013
    Location
    Florence, AL
    Age
    38
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Thanks pyroman, that's very generous of you. I will send you a p.m. Thanks, Andrew

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •