Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1

    Default General Advice Please

    Hey, I'm looking to thru hike the AT in the next couple of years but to be honest I'm fairly sedentary and know very little of what kind of equipment to bring and how to find good value for money on these items.

    What is also a realistic time frame to complete the trail?

    Any advice would be very welcome

  2. #2

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    There is a ton of information here, use the search function and spend lots of time reading.
    May be sone "sticky" posts or articles with lots of info too

    You may want to get in better shape beforehand.
    4-7 months
    Plenty of online places to buy gear cheap when its on sale, or buy used.
    Expect to spend ~$700-1500 on gear depending
    Most reccomend $4000-$5000 saved for the hike, after gear
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 12-20-2012 at 20:21.

  3. #3
    Rain Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-07-2003
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Age
    69
    Posts
    6,120
    Images
    620

    Default

    Realistically, most people don't complete it.

    Rain Man

    .
    ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: ... Defile not therefore the land which ye shall inhabit..... Numbers 35

    www.MeetUp.com/NashvilleBackpacker

    .

  4. #4
    Registered User Papa D's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-23-2008
    Location
    Athens, GA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    2,853
    Images
    7

    Default

    Rain Man is right and you don't sound totally committed to be honest.

    To thru-hike is a major endeavor - at the time I thru-hiked, it was a life endeavor not just a "hey, I'm looking to do this" which sounds sort of ambivalent.

    Long Distance Backpacking (in general) is a mental and physical endeavor - - the AT is much more difficult to hike for long-distances than people think - hikers get injured physically and mentally burned-out. A thru-hiker is a special sort of person. This doesn't mean you necessarily have to plan for months and months - many successful thru-hikers "wing it" a bit (much to many folks on this site's chagrin) and some folks that plan every detail of their hike for months on end can't deal with a little wrinkle in their plan, get frustrated and quit.

    I'd suggest good planning but with a lot of flexibility and a little bit of free-spirited (I'll figure it out) thrown-in. Be willing to change your mind about things such as what is an appropriate pack weight and about what you should carry, eat, how far you should hike in a day, whether to tent or shelter, etc. Like Muddy Waters noted, there is plenty of info out there - - take everything with a grain or two of salt and remember that this site is chocked full of nay-sayers .

    Like I said, Rain Man is right, most folks don't make it, but a lot of people DO make it - - maybe you're one of them - we just don't know.

  5. #5
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-29-2007
    Location
    High up in an old tree
    Posts
    14,440
    Journal Entries
    19
    Images
    16

    Default

    Well - maybe he needs to hike Hadrian's Wall first for practice, folks from the UK don't understand how big this county is at first... including the idiot who wrote "Walk in the Woods"

    Pathless I am not calling you an idiot - I had a bad moment with a cousin who visited.... I am a British Subject.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  6. #6
    GA-ME 2011
    Join Date
    03-17-2007
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Age
    62
    Posts
    3,071
    Images
    9

    Default

    My advice would be to do a lot of research. You can start here with the articles found on the home page. Then go to the ATC website and read everything there. Buy a trail guide, I recommend the A.T Guide by David Miller, it shows elevations as well as milage and tons of other information.

    After you're done all of that start researching gear. Search here and research info on specific items such as sleeping bags, packs etc.
    Check here for gear lists that people post for review, there's always lots of good discussion on what to bring on those. Don't be lazy and post a question like "What gear do I need to do the AT?". You won't get a lot of feedback from that. Feel free to ask specific questions if you have them.

    If you can find someone who has actually hiked the entire trail who you can talk with then pick their brain. Nothing beats first hand experience. I don't know if you're on Facebook but there are AT hiking groups on there. I know of several UK AT hikers on there, maybe one lives near you that you could meet and talk with.

    And when you've done all of this start taking some week long hikes to practice and get into shape.

    Good Luck!
    "Chainsaw" GA-ME 2011

  7. #7

    Default

    Since you aren't planning to thruhike immediately, best thing you can do is get out and start doing as much dayhiking as you can. Find out if you like it enough to do it day after day after day. Build up your mileage slowly. When you are comfortable with all day hikes, borrow or rent some gear (pack, sleeping bag and pad, tent) and see if you like sleeping out. Do some weekends where it rains all day. If you like that (or at least can find some fun in the situation), then start doing research to buy your own gear. There is a lot of info on this site about your basic requirements. Truth is, the gear isn't that important. What mattters for thruhiking, is wanting to be out on the trail for 4-6 months. And you can't know that at your current activity level.

  8. #8
    Registered User TheYoungOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-21-2010
    Location
    Southeast PA
    Age
    50
    Posts
    413

    Default

    The big thing you need to do is walk. You got to like walking. Take a 5km walk, and see if you like it. Then find a long trail in the UK and hike that first. I have grand scheme of going on a thru hike, but when you actually hike 15miles / 24km, or more a day you realize its actually a lot of physical work and at times a little boring. Its one thing for someone living on the east coast of the USA, to attempt a AT thru hike and realize on day 2 that its not for them and to go back home, but for you there is a lot more work involved. You have more travel expense, passports, visas, on top of everything else.


    So before you make that big commitment, get in shape, and do some research to see if it something you really want to do. Good luck.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-20-2002
    Location
    Damascus, Virginia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    31,187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pathlesswoodsuk View Post
    Hey, I'm looking to thru hike the AT in the next couple of years but to be honest I'm fairly sedentary and know very little of what kind of equipment to bring and how to find good value for money on these items.

    What is also a realistic time frame to complete the trail?

    Any advice would be very welcome
    i always took 5 1/2 months

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pathlesswoodsuk View Post
    Hey, I'm looking to thru hike the AT in the next couple of years but to be honest I'm fairly sedentary and know very little of what kind of equipment to bring and how to find good value for money on these items.

    What is also a realistic time frame to complete the trail?

    Any advice would be very welcome
    A wise man once said, "It's just walking."
    Shutterbug

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •