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  1. #1
    Registered User medicjimr's Avatar
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    Default Leki anitishock poles mods ?

    Has anyone ever tried to remove the antshock feature from there poles want to get rid of the extra weight and they don't work anyway. good poles besides that. I have the leki makalu ones
    Please remember the brave men and women of our armed services Without them we would not have the freedom to walk across this great nation.

  2. #2

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    Nope. Never. No need to shock ants.

    They do add weight.

    They don't work. (kinda like the seatpost shocks on bicycles that just bottom out).

    The springs make it a little more difficult to gauge how firm (or secure) the intended placement is before committing to a solid pole plant, too.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  3. #3
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    That's a good question... suggest an email to the their website.....
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  4. #4

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    Black diamond anti shock works. Get those

  5. #5
    Registered User medicjimr's Avatar
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    Not wanting them to work Want to eliminate the weight got them at a good price. Thanks for BD info though
    Please remember the brave men and women of our armed services Without them we would not have the freedom to walk across this great nation.

  6. #6

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    I don't belive it would be possible. It looks like what ever it is that makes it work is crimped into the pole. Trying to remove it would distroy the pole. Anyway, the amount of weight saved would be insignificant. Removing the hand straps would save more.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  7. #7

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    How bout a staff, any recommendations on one of those single walking staffs. I like my Stick, but don't think I want to carry it for days on end..to damn heavy. and not collapsible..anyone!

    oh yeah, and i'm a cheap bastard..."no argon zone" and no bottle opener, compass ect.ect.
    Last edited by rocketsocks; 02-11-2013 at 22:00.

  8. #8
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    I would never remove the wrist strap from poles. If you're using them right all the pressure is transferred to the wrist through the straps. Your hand are just lightly holding the grip.
    "Chainsaw" GA-ME 2011

  9. #9

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    Those were my first set, still got em, they're just fine, they're my loaners. Folks don't seem to care for the anti-shock feature but it really isn't bad. I wouldn't worry too much about a first set, the big risk is that you'll leave them somewhere or maybe you'll have a spill and break one. Someday if you're really into ultra-light and your budget allow you may be shopping for Gossamer Gear LT4's or the like but you'll probably still keep a cheap set of sticks around.

    David

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don H View Post
    I would never remove the wrist strap from poles. If you're using them right all the pressure is transferred to the wrist through the straps. Your hand are just lightly holding the grip.

    Exactly right. Ask any avid cross country skier. The pressure of the strap is on the back of your wrist if you're using it properly (grasp the pole below the loop and then slide it up through the loop then grasp the grip. The strap will go down the front of your palm and over the back of your wrist).

    If you put your hand down through the loop the pressure will be on the front of the wrist, cutting off blood flow and making your hands go numb.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by medicjimr View Post
    Has anyone ever tried to remove the antshock feature from there poles want to get rid of the extra weight and they don't work anyway. good poles besides that. I have the leki makalu ones
    I have the same poles. I was new to poles ,buying them used,so i have no frame of reference. Mine do not have a working shock tip,so there has to be a way . They make great spreader bars too. Did you try rotating the tip part clock wise all the way?

  12. #12
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    With regard to wrist straps, cut them off as soon as you can if you are hiking in rocky teritory. If you slip on rock with pole with a strap around your wrist, its highly likely that you are going to have a more severe accdient as the pole will inevitably not be exactly uprigth and will force you inadvertently in adirection you werent planning. Its is also more likley you will snap a wrist or pop a shoulder. If you are powerwalking on a groomed trail or cross country skiing on a groomed trail, feel free to use the straps but I guarantee you will rarely if ever see hikers using straps in the whites or most of maine.

    As for the springs, years ago I picked up some stiffer springs from Leki, not sure if they still sell them but they still have a bti if give when I want them to (downclimbing through boulders) but most of the time they are fairly stiff. The poles are 15 plus years old and have doen the AT so the mechanism failing isnt an issue unless you dont maintain the poles.

    The absolute best thing you can do with lekis is take them apart at the end of every trip and let them dry out. If they are used in very muddy conditions, on occasion you may want to clean out the bores of the upper tubes with a coat hanger and a piece of rag.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    With regard to wrist straps, cut them off as soon as you can if you are hiking in rocky teritory. If you slip on rock with pole with a strap around your wrist, its highly likely that you are going to have a more severe accdient as the pole will inevitably not be exactly uprigth and will force you inadvertently in adirection you werent planning. Its is also more likley you will snap a wrist or pop a shoulder. If you are powerwalking on a groomed trail or cross country skiing on a groomed trail, feel free to use the straps but I guarantee you will rarely if ever see hikers using straps in the whites or most of maine.

    As for the springs, years ago I picked up some stiffer springs from Leki, not sure if they still sell them but they still have a bti if give when I want them to (downclimbing through boulders) but most of the time they are fairly stiff. The poles are 15 plus years old and have doen the AT so the mechanism failing isnt an issue unless you dont maintain the poles.

    The absolute best thing you can do with lekis is take them apart at the end of every trip and let them dry out. If they are used in very muddy conditions, on occasion you may want to clean out the bores of the upper tubes with a coat hanger and a piece of rag.
    In difficult terrain I agree that not using the straps is a good idea (the forehead climb up Mt. Mansfield on the Long Trail comes immediately to mind) - however, I would seriously discourage anyone from cutting off the straps unless you want to lose much of the usefulness of the poles. The straps (when properly used) will allow you to put full weight on the poles without the need of a professional arm wrestler's vice like grip on the pole. If you have arthritis or tendonitis (I have the latter), the straps are a necessity - otherwise, it would be necessary for me to literally (not the figurative "literally" so misused by the younger generation) pry my fingers off of the handles, leaving them so stiff as to be useless to even untie my shoelaces. So, please,

    do not cut off your straps unless you'd rather not learn how to use them properly. They are there as an integral part of the pole system.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  14. #14
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    I respecfully disagree, for the average hiker in rocky terrain typical of new england, the straps are more a problem than solution. Very few folks use poles on the straight and level like on old road beds, most stow them or carry them in one hand as they can maintain a faster pace without them. Using straps is most dangerous going downhill, as that is where its easy to slip down and get hung up by the strap when the pole catches in a crevice. Generally most poles get bent in the lower section and its directly related to too much side to side force when a pole gets caught in a crevice. I have learned to let go when this happens but with someone with a strap around their wrist, they dont have that option and typically if the pole doesnt give, theri shoulder or wrist does.

    I find that most folks "palm" the poles when going down steep slopes typical of new england where their hand is placed over the top of the pole to get some extra length and direct application of pressure to the center of the pole. There is some marginal use to straps going uphill, those with normal hand strength who dont have issues like arthritis or tendonitis probably wont even use them. I used to leave the straps on poles but rarely if ever used them. On many lekis, the straps can be removed by removing a screw under the fliplock so I have a mint pair of straps somewhere in my gear room. I do use straps on my crosscountry ski poles and they are of great use on cross country ski trails which tend to be flat and relatively level so I am educated on the use of a pole system.

    I am not the only one, its quite rare to see Nobo thruhikers with straps on their poles when they hike through Gorham NH every summer.

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