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A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
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  1. #41
    Registered User rusty bumper's Avatar
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    I've never owned a water bladder so I can't comment on them. On my 5 month AT hike, 95% of the time I carried a single 1 liter sports drink bottle. It fit in the lower side mesh pocket of my Gossamer Gear pack and I could easily reach back for it without taking off my pack. I also carried a 2 liter, roll-up Platypus bottle that I used the few times water became scarce.

  2. #42
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    I own both - when I hike flat territory I generally do a ten with a 16oz bottle.... years ago I hiked up mt minsy with no knowledge of where the water was - there wasn't any - I shot thru the bladder and although I still had six miles to go I was parched and miserable. The first source was at the shelter, I did not care if it was filtered or not... I was really out of shape and not thinking clearly. In future if the UL bladder goes dry the Ul water bottle is the backup
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

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  3. #43

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    What I don't like about bladders are their weight and the fact that I can't easily see how much water I have left to drink.

    I like to carry 20 oz Gatorade bottles on my pack straps, held in place with cords that are secured by two cordlocks each (one cordlock tends to loosen too easily). So I am usually carrying 40 oz or less. If I know that 40 oz is not enough to get me to the next water source (which is rare, but happens), then I carry additional water in my pack in a platypus or evernew 2 L bag.

    I like the carrying comfort of having some of my heavier items (water) in front of my shoulders, the ease of getting a bottle out to drink from without taking off my pack or even stopping at all, and the ease of seeing exactly how much water I have left before running out.

    Works for me, but there are lots of ways to address this.
    I see a lot of people who carry way too much water weight, usually in a bladder that they fill up in the morning and still have a liter left when they get in to camp.
    Find the LIGHT STUFF at QiWiz.net

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  4. #44

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    I like to know how much water I am drinking & cant see via the bladder. So I carry 2 one liter Smartwater bottles on each side of my pack.

  5. #45
    Registered User macdaddy's Avatar
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    I usually overestimate my water needs, but would rather have too much than run out. I carry a 2L bladder, a 1L Platypus, and a 1/2L Nalgene. I like to attach my filter to the Nalgene when on the trail and then transfer to the bladder if refilling becomes necessary. The 1L Platypus is for camp water, those rare times that the 2L bladder is not enough or should the bladder fail. The 1/2L Nalgene is the reserve tank I hope I don't need or used for powdered Gatorade when I stop to eat.

  6. #46
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    As it should be obvious Baudetious, people look at bladders from different perspectives. Some folks use a bladder(s) to supplement water carrying like for in camp water use or for long stretches between water sources. They sometimes or often do this in addition to carrying water bottles typically stored in side backpack pockets or attached to shoulder straps. Some, like Lazarus just roll with two 1 L bottles on the AT, where water is fairly commmon and well documented, one attached to each shoulder strap. Others use bladders stored inside a backpack or sometimes on the outside in rear or side pockets with an attached tube and sip away while hiking by clenching down on a bite valve. Different ways to get it done with pros/cons with the various methods.

  7. #47
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    You might notice the folks who are water wt conscious or further advanced in UL ways TEND TO not opt for heavier water carrying systems and/or are more mindful of not carrying extra water wt than absolutely necessary. Water in itself is often the single heaviest item many hikers can carry. A gal. of water ways about 8.3 POUNDS! To give you some idea of what that wt for one gal of water means TO ME --- MY BIG 3(pack, shelter, sleep system) for 3 season UL thru-hiking typically weighs under 6 POUNDS, OFTEN even less!

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    As it should be obvious Baudetious, people look at bladders from different perspectives. Some folks use a bladder(s) to supplement water carrying like for in camp water use or for long stretches between water sources. They sometimes or often do this in addition to carrying water bottles typically stored in side backpack pockets or attached to shoulder straps. Some, like Lazarus just roll with two 1 L bottles on the AT, where water is fairly commmon and well documented, one attached to each shoulder strap. Others use bladders stored inside a backpack or sometimes on the outside in rear or side pockets with an attached tube and sip away while hiking by clenching down on a bite valve. Different ways to get it done with pros/cons with the various methods.
    Thanks for the excellent summary. Like many questions asked on this site, there is no right answer. Just whatever works for you.

    I did get some good ideas though. Thanks to everyone who responded.

  9. #49
    Registered User mrgadget921's Avatar
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    OMG ! what a brick.... OK for day hike?.... failures galore....

  10. #50

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    It definitely depends actually, on where you are hiking. On the AT, I'd only bring 2 liters.

    however, in Arizona, all bets are off. It was 90 degrees here today. Its so dry you dont even know if you are sweating, you dont sweat, so you dont know if you are overheating.

    So in Arizona, I carry my 2 liter Smartwater bottles PLUS a 2 liter Platy for storage. I dont overnight hike in Phoenix, but even in Flagstaff, its soooo dry!

    Can anyone say heat (abdominal) cramps? It got me today, still, after drinking 2.5 liters of water over just a 2.5 mile mountain hike, anyway.

  11. #51

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    Thanks for the review/link for the Jetflow! Just ordered the Raptor, can't wait to try this out. I too had ditched my hydration system about a year ago but added it back just last week because I didnt feel as if I was drinking enough water on the trail. For me, keeping hands free and sipping along the way is easiest. I think this Jetflow may be the answer?!

    Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk 2

  12. #52
    Registered User macdaddy's Avatar
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    Was carrying my 2L bladder in a hydration pack with a couple of snacks and two .5L Nalgene bottles on my waste pack on a 15 mile day hike Friday. 2 miles in I noticed the bladder was leaking down my back. Was able to turn the bladder upside down and transfer the water to my Nalgene bottles as I emtied them. Fortunately the leak was small and at the bottom, didn't lose too much.
    Without a backup plan for water my day would have ended early.

  13. #53

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    Glad that you were able to transfer the water. As for myself, I always have my water filter in my pack. Of course that doesn't do any good though if there isn't any waste source in the area you are hiking :-/

    Sent from down on the farm

  14. #54
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    I have used camelbaks, platypus's as well as nalgene's and klean kanteens. After using both bladders and bottles, I prefer bottles. After awhile the water towards to end of the bladder tastes like rubber. The only time I still use camelbaks now are for endurance events or when I go out riding my mountain bike. I love the concept of the platypus but even after cleaning it the remaining few drops of water inside reminds me of a petri dish.

  15. #55
    Registered User Yukon's Avatar
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    Bottles here. Used to use a Camelback but got tired of taking it out of the pack. Now I just use one metal bottle and one Nalgene wide mouth bottle.

  16. #56
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    Lazurus, and to all,

    How did you get you bottles to stay on you pack straps?

    I have an Atmos 65 and the side pockets are pretty useless. I have a 3L osprey bladder. It is too much weight. Also I cannot mix any gatorade or the like with it.

    I'm doing the section of the AT from Springer to Fontana damn, and based on the AT guide in front of me, there should be plenty of water.

    soooooo.....................................

    How did you do that????????

  17. #57
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    The straps on the ULA catalyst have two bands that can be tightened around the bottes on each straps You can see them here they are yellow in color
    Blackheart

  18. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by misterfloyd View Post
    Lazurus, and to all,

    How did you get you bottles to stay on you pack straps?

    I have an Atmos 65 and the side pockets are pretty useless. I have a 3L osprey bladder. It is too much weight. Also I cannot mix any gatorade or the like with it.

    I'm doing the section of the AT from Springer to Fontana damn, and based on the AT guide in front of me, there should be plenty of water.

    soooooo.....................................

    How did you do that????????
    I have an osprey atmos 50, I use the tall narrow Gatorade bottle for the side pocket,and now my water bottle is actually accessible. I have a sawyer squeeze and use those bladders for camp water.the sawyer bladders are much lighter than either the osprey, platypus or camelback bladders, although not as durable.from springer to Damascus I never needed to carry more than a liter of water.summer time, though, these sources can dry to a trickle.

  19. #59
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    Buckeye and Hiker boy,

    Thanks for the quick reply !

    I have been trying to put stuff in from the side. I have tried smart water bottles as well they do not stay securely in there. Will keep trying.

    Floyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by misterfloyd View Post
    Buckeye and Hiker boy,

    Thanks for the quick reply !

    I have been trying to put stuff in from the side. I have tried smart water bottles as well they do not stay securely in there. Will keep trying.

    Floyd
    i keep the squeeze in the side pocket, upright closest to the rear of the pack,i stick the gatorade bottle in the side opening of the side pocket, and i can awkwardly retrieve it without taking off my pack.i used to use a bladder, but dislike not knowing exactly how much water i have, almost always ended up carrying way too much,and usually still not drinking enough because i never knew when it would run dry.if i need to carry more than a liter, i just fill one of the sawyer bladders, stick it in the rear pocket

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