Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-31-2013
    Location
    Sierra Nevada CA
    Age
    58
    Posts
    3

    Default Cold Butt Syndrome

    I am a total NewBe to hammock camping. I haven't even taken it out of the bag yet. But after spending a lot of time reading the hammock blogs, I can see that bottom warmth is a huge issue. Many people talk about how compression of sleeping bags and pads keep the bottom half of your body from maintaining a comfortable temperature even though that is the same event that happens while sleeping on the ground. It seems that instead of piling layer upon layer of different forms of insulation like your out of the Princess and the Pea. Why not establish layers of warm air?

    If you were to put your sleeping bag around the entire hammock and possibly even one or two thin layers of a light material to trap warm air within the bottom of the hammock and your sleeping bag, like wearing clothes in cold weather; the jacket itself doesn't keep you warm, it's how warm it keeps the air against your body. It would be like sewing two very light thin bags to the bottom of the hammock. Of course there would be zipper issues trying to enclose your hammock inside your sleeping bag but most of you seem to have graduated from McGiver University!

    i humbly apologize if I missed this in my research and reading. I certainly do not think that I know everything, especially since I have not even removed my first hammock from its bag. I would like to read your feedback on this issue as it will give me the opportunity to learn more about the craft.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-28-2010
    Location
    Montgomery, AL
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I'm a moderately experienced hammocker. Your idea seems plausible, but I have 2 concerns: (1) will your body be able to heat all of that volume of air and maintain a comfortable temp? (2) how much will all of that material and insulation weigh?

    Because of those issues, I think you may find that it's much more efficient to use an under quilt + top quilt setup.

    But at the end of the day, ham mocking is a unique cottage industry and many great and successful ideas come from folks like us - just keep tinkering with your gear and see what happens! I've found www.hammockforums.net to be a great resource.

  3. #3
    Registered User Grits's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-09-2009
    Location
    Boone, NC
    Posts
    265
    Images
    47

    Default Cbs

    Quote Originally Posted by sierrasteve View Post
    I am a total NewBe to hammock camping. I haven't even taken it out of the bag yet. But after spending a lot of time reading the hammock blogs, I can see that bottom warmth is a huge issue. Many people talk about how compression of sleeping bags and pads keep the bottom half of your body from maintaining a comfortable temperature even though that is the same event that happens while sleeping on the ground. It seems that instead of piling layer upon layer of different forms of insulation like your out of the Princess and the Pea. Why not establish layers of warm air?

    If you were to put your sleeping bag around the entire hammock and possibly even one or two thin layers of a light material to trap warm air within the bottom of the hammock and your sleeping bag, like wearing clothes in cold weather; the jacket itself doesn't keep you warm, it's how warm it keeps the air against your body. It would be like sewing two very light thin bags to the bottom of the hammock. Of course there would be zipper issues trying to enclose your hammock inside your sleeping bag but most of you seem to have graduated from McGiver University!

    i humbly apologize if I missed this in my research and reading. I certainly do not think that I know everything, especially since I have not even removed my first hammock from its bag. I would like to read your feedback on this issue as it will give me the opportunity to learn more about the craft.
    Great question and a lot depends on how you want to set up your system and the cost envolved. Think of making a mini enviroment. think the wall of your house insulation layer and structural layer. The hammock is your structural layer and your insulation layer can be a pad between a double layer hammock or underquilt under the hammock. (you can't compress your insulation layer without getting CBS.) Lots of different ideas about the use of vapor barriers on quilts and how to deal with moisture issues. Check out these good sources.

    http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockCampingWarm.html
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...splay.php?f=88
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...splay.php?f=36

    Shugs videos are a great source of information also good he gets into insulation at about 8 min into this 10 min video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7NZVqpBUV0

    Enjoy the madness

  4. #4

    Default

    I think what you are suggesting has been definitely done before and it was done before underquilts came to be. I am just talking out of my rusty memory and I did not google it up but I think one of the first evangelists to hammocking was a dude called Sperry or Perry. He created just that - a cocoon around your hammock. I think he even may have called it Sperry hammock. Underquilts are just simpler to use I think but occassionally I hear of people using a sleeping bag around the entire hammock when their funds haven't materialized yet for an underquilt.

    Also I have seen in extreme cold some guys zipping theri down jacket around the foot section of the hammock for an extra kick of warmth.
    Let me go

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Marta's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-30-2005
    Location
    NW MT
    Posts
    5,468
    Images
    56

    Default

    http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/PeaPod.htm

    Is what you're trying to describe.

    I have also seen a sleeping bag modified to wrap around a hammock. The shape isn't quite right. It's a bit tight around the middle.
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

    ME>GA 2006
    http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=3277

    Instagram hiking photos: five.leafed.clover

  6. #6

    Default

    With a few modifications you can just use a design similar to this. Sounds like you just want like a sleeping bag sock or the like.
    http://gear-report.com/wp-content/up..._UQ_how_to.jpg

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-31-2013
    Location
    Sierra Nevada CA
    Age
    58
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I'd like to thank you for sacrificing your time to respond to my question. The link you supplied answered many details to my question including the fact that I did not think it though because if I did this it would keep me from using my bug net.
    appreciate your insight.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-31-2013
    Location
    Sierra Nevada CA
    Age
    58
    Posts
    3

    Default

    This is a GREAT idea.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-05-2012
    Location
    State College, PA
    Age
    38
    Posts
    324

    Default

    Just my 2 cents...get an underquilt. I was trying the same thing on my SOBO hike..oh, my bag will be fine, oh, I'll just use a pad under me, oh, I'll wear extra clothes...Got 3 hours sleep one night when it hit 32deg in Maine (was mid-July). After that I ponied up and bought an underquilt! But, as always, HYOH. Just test it before you go out...a night of no-sleep can seriously ruin a weekend.

  10. #10
    Registered User AngryGerman's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-30-2012
    Location
    Broome County NY
    Age
    40
    Posts
    128

    Default

    Put a 3/4 length sleeping pad inside your sleeping bag and when it gets really cold put your raincoat under your butt. I was hammocking last year on my thru and really didn't have to start putting the pad in the bag on a regular basis until PA. As mentioned before, there are all types of methods, but first you need to hang the thing and sleep in it a few times before you hit the trail to really understand how it all will come together for you. There is a short learning curve and if you start your thru w/o testing your gear you will be at the very beginning of that curve; not recommended.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-29-2013
    Location
    Johnson City, TN
    Age
    42
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Buy a clark nx-250, stuff the pockets and you will be fine

  12. #12
    Wannabe Hiker darkbyrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-19-2013
    Location
    Pisgah Nat'l Forest, NC
    Posts
    10

    Default

    A clark would be awfully heavy for a thru... hyoh of course.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-29-2013
    Location
    Johnson City, TN
    Age
    42
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darkbyrd View Post
    A clark would be awfully heavy for a thru... hyoh of course.
    it is heavy, but it is worth it.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •