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Thread: Please Explain

  1. #1

    Default Please Explain

    I made a trip to REI and Dick's yesterday to check out hammock camping gear. It looks like something that Snacktime might enjoy, and everything seemed so light I suspected it might be a weight-saving option. Unfortunately, what I found is that it would actually almost double our shelter weight....requiring each of us to tote our approx. 4lbs instead of the shared 4lb tent.

    Also, I didn't care much for the insulation or dryness factors.

    So what's the attraction? It still looks so "cool" to me, but the downsides seem to many.
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    I made a trip to REI and Dick's yesterday to check out hammock camping gear. It looks like something that Snacktime might enjoy, and everything seemed so light I suspected it might be a weight-saving option. Unfortunately, what I found is that it would actually almost double our shelter weight....requiring each of us to tote our approx. 4lbs instead of the shared 4lb tent.

    Also, I didn't care much for the insulation or dryness factors.

    So what's the attraction? It still looks so "cool" to me, but the downsides seem to many.
    Dryness factors?

    The main attraction is comfort. I don't sleep well when camping. I sleep even less well on the ground. On a hammock, I sleep almost as well as in a bed.

  3. #3

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    The picture of the tarp set up on the ENOs tag seems to allow a great deal of open area on the sides. I was thinking it would provide little protection against lateral rain or even heavy morning dew. Thus my dryness factor question.

    Essentially then, if the comfort factor is not the issue, then it may not really be of any benefit to me?
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

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    Registered User Old Hiker's Avatar
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    Solo - makes sense. With a partner - maybe not so much. I love mine, but hated it when I had to get out of it to get ready for the Trail on bad days.

    Pros for me: Comfortable, warm (lots of opinions on under quilts - I've never had to use one), I could actually sit to put my boots on or eat, etc., off the ground in really hard rains (saw 2-3 inches of flowing water under me several times camping), lighter than my old ALPS tent, same as my new LightHeart Gear SoLong 6, hang almost anywhere.

    Cons: not much privacy, getting out on bad days, VERY warm here in FL - the bug netting does NOT let wind through.

    Went back to a tent after blowing cold rain. Couldn't get the hang of getting out without getting damp, if not wet.

    I have an older Clark jungle hammock, extra large fly.
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    Unfortunately, what I found is that it would actually almost double our shelter weight....requiring each of us to tote our approx. 4lbs instead of the shared 4lb tent.
    I am not a fan of hammocks, but when you do your calculations subtract the weight of the sleeping pads you won't need.
    Love people and use things; never the reverse.

    Mt. Katahdin would be a lot quicker to climb if its darn access trail didn't start all the way down in Georgia.

  6. #6

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    Another attraction is being able to set up camp almost anywhere, as opposed to having to hunt for a flat open area for a tent.

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    Teacher,

    Weight seems to be about the same as tenting to me when going solo. You are correct about the weight penilty for two, when I bring the kids I pack a tent.

    Dryness: I have no problem staying dry in my hammock, get a good size tarp and pitch it tight. In my tent I have been flooded when I chose my site poorly.

    Insulation: I have been as warm (or as cold) in my hammock as my tent. It all depends on what you want to haul for underquilts and top quilt.

    Comfort: No competition here. My hammock is so comfortable, even more so than my bed. At my age I have begun to suffer in a tent. When I am on my own there is no question, I am bringing my hammock.
    Last edited by imscotty; 07-16-2013 at 13:17.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by JustaTouron View Post
    I am not a fan of hammocks, but when you do your calculations subtract the weight of the sleeping pads you won't need.
    Actually the sleeping pad is a necessity for warmth for me, and ENOs makes one just for the hammock, so the weight is included for myself which actually brought it up to about 5lbs
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiptoe View Post
    Another attraction is being able to set up camp almost anywhere, as opposed to having to hunt for a flat open area for a tent.
    unless of course you're on top of a bald
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

  10. #10

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    I guess the issue here is that I always assume that if I can't see the appeal of something so popular, or if the downsides seem to outweigh the benefits, I must be missing something.

    I can see here that I was pretty accurate in seeing the downsides that would be important to me, and for that confirmation I thank you.

    I will probably try it out for the "fun" factor when I don't have to haul it in our current manner.....or pick up the set up for Strife on our next 3-person outing as the tent only holds 2.
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    The picture of the tarp set up on the ENOs tag seems to allow a great deal of open area on the sides. I was thinking it would provide little protection against lateral rain or even heavy morning dew. Thus my dryness factor question.
    Morning dew doesn't fall sideways, so anything overhead is going to keep out the morning dew.

    As for sideways driving rain, it would seem that that just requires you to pitch the tarp close enough to the hammock to keep the rain out. The hammock setups I've seen while hiking around GSMNP have not left we wondering if those people would stay dry during a heavy rain.

    Interestingly enough, I was hiking this past weekend at a site where there was about a dozen people. The setups that had the largest footprint (as measured by the extents of guylines) were the hammocks.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    I guess the issue here is that I always assume that if I can't see the appeal of something so popular, or if the downsides seem to outweigh the benefits, I must be missing something.
    I hear ya.

    Took me four internal frame backpacks to realize that for *ME*a cheap external pack beats even an expensive internal frame pack. Yes, it weights a few pounds more, but even for relatively light load 20 lbs on my back with an external pack is more comfortable than 18 lbs with an internal and as the weight goes up even more so.
    Love people and use things; never the reverse.

    Mt. Katahdin would be a lot quicker to climb if its darn access trail didn't start all the way down in Georgia.

  13. #13

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    I fully appreciate the "hyoh" idea, but a novice needs experience to learn what "yoh" is, and advice can make that experience so much more pleasant!
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    The picture of the tarp set up on the ENOs tag seems to allow a great deal of open area on the sides. I was thinking it would provide little protection against lateral rain or even heavy morning dew. Thus my dryness factor question.

    Essentially then, if the comfort factor is not the issue, then it may not really be of any benefit to me?
    P1010609.jpg
    June 12, 2012 Tropical Storm Debbie dumped 12 inches of rain, including horizontal rain and not one drop got in my Hennessy Hammock. I believe you can depend on a good hammock keeping you dry.
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  15. #15

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    Out of curiosity....why were you hammock camping in a tropical storm?
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

  16. #16

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    What's the likelihood of snake friendliness in a hammock? I imagine it would be easy enough to snuggle in for some warmth? Is that an issue?
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    The picture of the tarp set up on the ENOs tag seems to allow a great deal of open area on the sides. I was thinking it would provide little protection against lateral rain or even heavy morning dew. Thus my dryness factor question.

    Essentially then, if the comfort factor is not the issue, then it may not really be of any benefit to me?
    I can't comment on the tarp you mentioned--I have a huge tarp, 12x12. I find it to be drier than a backpacking style tent, as I don't have to crawl in and out of it. That said, to me, comfort is the main reason. It's especially good in the summertime. In a hammock without bottom insulation, 72 degrees is almost cold.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    What's the likelihood of snake friendliness in a hammock? I imagine it would be easy enough to snuggle in for some warmth? Is that an issue?
    Snakes can't get in if you have a bugnet.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by perdidochas View Post
    I can't comment on the tarp you mentioned--I have a huge tarp, 12x12. I find it to be drier than a backpacking style tent, as I don't have to crawl in and out of it. That said, to me, comfort is the main reason. It's especially good in the summertime. In a hammock without bottom insulation, 72 degrees is almost cold.
    Yeah, I was thinking it would be pretty nice in the heat.....unless the nylon hammock itsel doesn't breathe?
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    Yeah, I was thinking it would be pretty nice in the heat.....unless the nylon hammock itsel doesn't breathe?
    Unless it's coated, it will breath. I don't know of non-breathable hammocks--mine are homemade. It's great in heat. I was cold with a fleece bag liner in 72 degrees this summer (but I am a wimp when it comes to cold).

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