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  1. #1
    Registered User John B's Avatar
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    Default New PCT record, Josh Garrett, article

    Today's San Francisco Chronicle has a good article with pics on Josh Garrett's PCT record: http://blog.sfgate.com/stienstra/201...3-pic-gallery/

  2. #2
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    Has anyone found the daily distances josh did? I'm intrigued how he could take a zero yet still come back and set a record. I have see both Anish and Matt's numbers but not Josh. I would love to compare his days with anish and the numbers I have on Scott and Adams earlier record hike.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    Has anyone found the daily distances josh did? I'm intrigued how he could take a zero yet still come back and set a record. I have see both Anish and Matt's numbers but not Josh. I would love to compare his days with anish and the numbers I have on Scott and Adams earlier record hike.
    Besides being supported and not having to walk an extra 30 miles, one huge advantage over Anish was being behind her and knowing what he needed to catch up. After his zero I think he needed to average 1.5 more miles per day to catch up.

    Those three factors maker her hike even more incredible.

  4. #4
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sly View Post
    Besides being supported and not having to walk an extra 30 miles, one huge advantage over Anish was being behind her and knowing what he needed to catch up. After his zero I think he needed to average 1.5 more miles per day to catch up.

    Those three factors maker her hike even more incredible.
    Agreed. Factors lost by the S.F. Chronicle reporter.

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  5. #5
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
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    Sigh- on one hand- I guess I should be happy that backpacking gets any press- on the other hand- what a ****e article. At least there were some pics. This article should go in the bin for those "fame and fortune" folks. Guy has corporate sponsors and still can't get a decent article written- great hike either way- but sad to see a trail record fall that has long been held by team backpacker...

  6. #6

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    Yeah Bill! Ultramarathoners are not backpackers huh? lol...Better tell most backpackers! Mr. Garrett has hiked the PCT before, and decited he could hike it real fast with some help...actually hiking the trail hundreds of miles in between help...I don't expect most to understand, the PCT is a different beast.

  7. #7
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    Mikey,

    Ask this guy about his great trip, great memories, funny stories... and basically you got a story about as interesting as the taste of cardboard. That's why stories like this don't really mean much to hikers. Part of the hike is the physical stress this guy endured but the other part of the hike is the stories. like little towns with weird people, stopping at deep creek hot springs, hitting up Mt whitney, kicking it down to lower Yosemite, checking out the redwoods, imagining your John Muir when you walk by Ritter and Banner, that's what hiking is about to most hikers. This guy's story will be.... I got 4 hours of sleep every night, it was hot in the desert and cold at night.

    Still a good feat (I know I couldn't do it) but until you get some Kenyans up here to test the PCT speed records it's mostly like playing basketball against a bunch of short people.
    * Warning: I bite AND I do not play well with others! -hellkat-

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by magic_game03 View Post
    Mikey,

    Ask this guy about his great trip, great memories, funny stories... and basically you got a story about as interesting as the taste of cardboard. That's why stories like this don't really mean much to hikers. Part of the hike is the physical stress this guy endured but the other part of the hike is the stories. like little towns with weird people, stopping at deep creek hot springs, hitting up Mt whitney, kicking it down to lower Yosemite, checking out the redwoods, imagining your John Muir when you walk by Ritter and Banner, that's what hiking is about to most hikers. This guy's story will be.... I got 4 hours of sleep every night, it was hot in the desert and cold at night.

    Still a good feat (I know I couldn't do it) but until you get some Kenyans up here to test the PCT speed records it's mostly like playing basketball against a bunch of short people.
    Could be some truth in what you say, but I must say, once when I was doing a speedhike of the JMT, more than once I saw just incredible sunsets and alpen glow (that occurs an hour later) , while hiking past many tents with their occupants inside totally missing out on the light show going on.
    (My companion at the time made some comments about the people in their tents reading their Steinbeck instead)

    Same with dawn and predawn.
    These are the best times of the day to be hiking IMO yet most long distance hikers don't get to see it.

    So before you go telling folks that the best part is the stories, try getting up at 4:30 and hiking till 10PM and perhaps your "favorite" will change.
    Or better yet, realize that not everyone has the same priorities.
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiddlehead View Post
    Could be some truth in what you say, but I must say, once when I was doing a speedhike of the JMT, more than once I saw just incredible sunsets and alpen glow (that occurs an hour later) , while hiking past many tents with their occupants inside totally missing out on the light show going on.
    (My companion at the time made some comments about the people in their tents reading their Steinbeck instead)

    Same with dawn and predawn.
    These are the best times of the day to be hiking IMO yet most long distance hikers don't get to see it.

    So before you go telling folks that the best part is the stories, try getting up at 4:30 and hiking till 10PM and perhaps your "favorite" will change.
    Or better yet, realize that not everyone has the same priorities.
    Exactly! Well stated.
    Pain is a by-product of a good time.

  10. #10
    Registered User quasarr's Avatar
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    Really, Deep Creek was one of the highlights of the PCT?? Am I the only one who thought Deep Creek was disgusting? That place was packed with algae, litter, ***** covered toilet paper, and sketchy townies. I didn't even get water there.

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