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  1. #1
    Registered User
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    10-20-2013
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    Default Canvas boots and the cold(winter)

    I'm looking into getting a pair of canvas boots and I'm kind of worried about fording when it's cold out and having thin (minimalist) canvas boots. I know they'll dry out and with some of my other fabric boots usually good warm wool socks and movement will keep my feet toasty enough while wet but I'm actually looking at split toe boots so I'm worried the separation and synthetic socks won't keep my feet as warm especially in winter with thin wet canvas.

    Has anyone had any experience with thin wet canvas shoes in the cold? Should I be worried and not buy the shoes? Is there anything I can do to combat the cold other than wearing warm socks and keep moving?
    Some of the boot models I've been looking at have rubber that goes partway up the foot, or covers the foot but has a fabric ankle but I'm worried they'll hold water and won't dry out on the trail and that's what I'm trying to avoid with canvas.

    I guess I'm really looking for some insight on how to deal with winter wetness, especially snow. I'm doing a sobo so I hope I don't encounter any snow on the caps but better to be prepared!

  2. #2

    Default

    What are we talkin here, thin canvas...like Pro keds high tops?

  3. #3
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
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    07-06-2013
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    Chicago, Il
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    Default

    perhaps you should post a link to the boot in question- we have questions.

  4. #4
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    10-22-2002
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    Winston-Salem, NC
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    Default

    Cotton canvas? Bad. Nylon fabric? Maybe ok depending on where you want to hike in the winter. For me, I switch to Gore-tex trail runners in the winter, with gaiters and thick wool socks. These trail runners are made of nylon fabric. I can hike in snow as deep as my gaiters. I'm not fording rivers or anything here in the South, so that's not an issue.

    Where do you want to hike? Winter in Tennessee is way different than winter in the White Mountains.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

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