Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-01-2013
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    671

    Default Any value to the CleverHiker video series?

    I am neither novice nor expert. However, despite many years of outdoors experience, the past several months have seen a near complete turn over in my equipment and practices. I have benefited a great deal from this and other forums; new tips, others' experiences ect.

    I am curious if anyone has purchased the video series from CleverHiker.com by Dave Collins. The intro video is visually impressive. Can anyone comment on the content?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Registered User kayak karl's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-21-2007
    Location
    Swedesboro, NJ
    Age
    65
    Posts
    5,339
    Images
    25

    Default

    you will learn what you need to know about hiking by Neel Gap and resupply by NOC, if not sooner have fun and beware of these self proclaimed experts, it's just walking
    I'm so confused, I'm not sure if I lost my horse or found a rope.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-01-2013
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    671

    Default

    Thanks kayak karl.

  4. #4

    Default

    Can you set up a tent? Can you select a decent campsite? Can you boil water? There isn't much else to hiking until you go off trail or into the real wilderness.

  5. #5
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2004
    Location
    Colorado Plateau
    Age
    46
    Posts
    11,002

    Default

    It all depends.

    Some people prefer an A-B-C-D-E approach to learning: Everything laid out, in steps and easy to follow. "Here's a way to do it, and I'll show you how to do it"

    For a busy person (e.g. one who has a family), learning the basics before going out there with precious free time is better for some situations.
    NOTHING is a good as going out there and learning, but being a bit prepared and making the most out of the rare free weekend has a certain allure.

    These videos, a guided trip or even a class from the local outdoor group has benefit for a certain type of person. Likewise, there is much free info online (websites, forums like this one, Youtube), but not everyone has the time or inclination to sift through the large amount of info.

    If you have the free time, grab a book to learn the basics of what to pack and then get out there every weekend you can. You'll learn more and see what works for you.

    But, again, that is not an option that works well for everyone and all situations.

    IF I was 39 with two kids and started to take up backpacking AND had one free weekend a month or so, I'd be very interested in being a bit more prepared than "just go out there, stumble and figure it out"

    That above method is fun and very effective when you are 29 w/o kids , no SO and have all the free time to yourself and have the right inclination.
    Not so much fun if you don't have much free time and every free weekend is rare and counts quite a bit.

    Just my .02 worth.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
    http://pmags.com
    Twitter: @pmagsco
    Facebook: pmagsblog

    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-01-2013
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    671

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rasty View Post
    Can you set up a tent? Can you select a decent campsite? Can you boil water? There isn't much else to hiking until you go off trail or into the real wilderness.
    All this is true. However, I have discovered rather recently that replacing the Quest Preying Mantis tent (a tent that I loved and adored for years but weighed in at 6.5 lbs) with tarp and hammock completely changed my hiking experience. Even when tenting, I use a Tarptent product that I didn't know existed just 6 months ago. I had carried my Coleman PEAK 1 white gas stove and matching stainless steel cook-kit on hundreds of trips, oblivious to the joys of alcholol and IMUSA until last year. My ULA Catalyst, another product I discovered in the last 2 years, replaced a squeeky REI external frame Wonderland I purchased for a 1989 Outward Bound trip. I still hike in leather, Gore-tex lined boots but, I now know enough to question that.

    Not counting days hikes, my hiking is limited to 2-5 days trips about 5 times a year. This forum, Hammockforums and Shug Emery youtube videos have made a remarkable difference in my outdoors experience. Don't sell short the information the members of this forum share freely. With that in mind, I was wondering if any forum members here had found Dave Collins' videos as valuable. From the lackluster response, it seems that "NO" is the answer to that question.

    Thanks again

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-17-2013
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Age
    40
    Posts
    85

    Default

    I haven't seen the videos OCDave but I was curious if you use a spreadsheet for your gear list? That has helped me tremendously. I could pinpoint where I needed to drop weight and then do a ton of research before making a purchase. It appears we learn from the same channels(forums, YouTube, etc) so that is why I mentioned it.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-09-2013
    Location
    Western NC
    Age
    65
    Posts
    69

    Default

    http://www.pmags.com/review-cleverhiker-com

    Here is a review of the videos

    I went through a similar experience with updating equipment after about a decade off from doing anything other than day/overnights due to having kids and all that other adult stuff I had managed to avoid for so many years. I did not use these videos - just did what you have already done with forums and reading articles.

    If you do purchase/use any of the videos, a lot of us would be interested in knowing if you found them of value.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-01-2013
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    671

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CB1821 View Post
    If you do purchase/use any of the videos, a lot of us would be interested in knowing if you found them of value.
    From MAGS website or his posts on this forum is were I learned of the video series.

    I sense that the info they provide is free for the taking right here. I have decided against purchasing the videos.

    Thank you everyone for your input.

  10. #10
    PCT, Sheltowee, Pinhoti, LT , BMT, AT, SHT, CDT 560 miles 10-K's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-30-2007
    Location
    Erwin, TN
    Age
    59
    Posts
    8,436

    Default

    I wouldn't buy them either.

    It doesn't take very long to figure out the basics and once you have a foundation you can build on that through sites like this and BPL.

    The joke at my house is that I have enough gear to take me and 3 people I don't like hiking..

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-03-2011
    Location
    North Conway, NH
    Age
    35
    Posts
    481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mags View Post
    It all depends.

    . . .

    IF I was 39 with two kids and started to take up backpacking AND had one free weekend a month or so, I'd be very interested in being a bit more prepared than "just go out there, stumble and figure it out"

    That above method is fun and very effective when you are 29 w/o kids , no SO and have all the free time to yourself and have the right inclination.
    Not so much fun if you don't have much free time and every free weekend is rare and counts quite a bit.

    Just my .02 worth.
    Well thought and well said.
    Merry 2012 AT blog
    "Not all those who wander are lost."

  12. #12
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2004
    Location
    Colorado Plateau
    Age
    46
    Posts
    11,002

    Default

    OCDave, the videos are aimed more at beginners than someone like yourself to be honest esp if you are talking about using a tarp regularly.


    Having said, while I readily agree getting out there and actually going backpacking is best way to learn, I don't get into "it's just walking" 100%. There is a place, and purpose, for books (and now videos) that lay a ground work for fine tuning your techniques.

    For many of a certain generation, it was Colin Fletcher's "Complete Walker" that guided them on the path.

    I remember my first mistake prone trip, stumbled a bit that summer and read Karen Berger's "Hiking and Backpacking" a little later. Kinda of a cliff notes version of backpacking techniques (tents vs tarp, external frame vs internal, basic navigation), how you can use grocery store food for backpacking and the concept of long hiking trails. Woah! Elementary stuff to me NOW, not elementary to me THEN. That summer took the lessons learned, stumbled less and thru-hiked the Long Trail the following year and then the AT the next.

    There is a wealth of free information out there. Hell , my own website contributes to that noise.

    All I am saying is that for *some* people, the A-B-C-D-E approach is just what they want/need. When I used to lead beginner backpacking trips for my former outdoor group, they were popular. Not because of my rugged good looks (ha!) or undeniable charm (double ha!), but because some people enjoyed the work shop format and going over the gear, being shown the ropes by someone experienced and THEN going on on their own or with a friend.

    So yeah, "open source" info is awesome. As I said, I'm a contributor myself in my own way.

    But much like people would rather buy a computer with OS X or Windows installed on it rather than futz around with the many free distros of a *nix environment, some people would rather have something concise, bundled and put together in a logical way rather than seek out the info on their own.

    Maybe as I get older, and see the limited time many of my friends with children have, I can see the value of someone paying for a book, video or class rather then futzing around their own and learning the info on places like whiteblaze, backpacking light and the many good YouTube videos avail. When one son has soccer practice and another son just broke his leg, cruising on the web to learn the difference between silnylon and cuben fiber takes a backseat.

    For the average WBer who can cruise the web to see which tarp pitch technique is best, the value of a class/book/video series is limited.
    Last edited by Mags; 11-05-2013 at 00:15.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
    http://pmags.com
    Twitter: @pmagsco
    Facebook: pmagsblog

    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,011

    Default

    Learn from others' experiences, but hiking/thru-hiking is a very independent activity for many so U will eventually have to learn what is right for U in the moment. U will have to think for yourself. That scares the crap out of some though. IMO, it's at the root of why some quit their anticipated hikes! They want to be told what to do, what to believe, how to proceed, Step 123, HOW TO HIKE THE AT, WHAT GEAR THEY NEED, etc. What most give is what worked for themselves and for the masses. U have to find a way to apply what U learn from others, IF THERE IS ANY WORTH IN IT FOR YOU, TO YOU. And, again, learning what is hiking appropriate for you will evolve will change as you as a person will evolve will change. Embrace that change. MY hiking is always a road under construction to me. I don't consider myself as having "arrived" as a hiker, or as Joe Hiker. Embrace the expansion Be willing to admit and accept it. It will keep you open to lifelong learning and provide some balance in life with a good dose of humility.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-12-2009
    Location
    Spring Lake, MI
    Age
    55
    Posts
    1,466

    Default

    [QUOTE=OCDave;1813688]...discovered... that replacing the Quest Preying Mantis tent (a tent that I loved and adored for years but weighed in at 6.5 lbs) with tarp and hammock completely changed my hiking experience. ... ..
    /QUOTE]

    I see you are from MN. I am from MI. Backpacking/Hiking in our states is not the same. Even when we listen to people on sites like WB, it doesn't substitute for the actual experience. I certainly shaved off a little weight after reading WB forums. After actually hiking, I shaved of a LOT of weight!

    I have brought friends from MI to hike. The only way I can even approximate the trail conditions on the AT is to have them walk up and down the stairs at the Lake Michigan dunes; however, as they say - this is not nearly the same!

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •