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Thread: Name and shame

  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homer&Marje View Post
    He's Australian. Not European. It's a Continent Well trolled Whykickamoocow..... still HMHDI!
    haha that's the second time in a week that I read Australian to be Austrian.

    Maybe I should have changed my post from Euros to foreigners... I've never met an Aussie but it seems like they still carry of a lot of the European sensibilities... other than when they're playing follow the leader with us.

  2. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by zoidfu View Post
    haha that's the second time in a week that I read Australian to be Austrian.

    Maybe I should have changed my post from Euros to foreigners... I've never met an Aussie but it seems like they still carry of a lot of the European sensibilities... other than when they're playing follow the leader with us.

    There all just criminals. Just like us Americans apparently

    Right TW?

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    The sad thing was that I spent a rainy Sunday at the hostel in Glencliffe and heard several NOBOs saying pretty much exactly what you said, and they were serious. Dead serious.

    A number of times I overheard other NOBOs saying rotten things about people they had hiked hundreds of miles with, their supposed "friends," because of various hiking infractions.

    Alas, the original post was pretty much what a few people say, and they mean it. If you search "purism" or "purists" on Whiteblaze, you'll see what I mean.
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

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  4. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by whykickamoocow View Post
    Even after enjoying or probably more accurately suffering through my company for 6 months, do you all still not understand the concept of satire. I did notice that people did start running down the trail in the opposite direction when they saw me coming, or they would hide behind a tree and pretend they could not see me. I must say people were so intense on the trail, and I just had to slightly yank peoples chain to get a massive reaction, where I am from satire, black humor, and sledging are a way of life. Although there were many who had a marvelous sense of humor on the trail, but you were always in great danger if you took me literally, I thought the quip about purple hearts would have been the give away. Purism was always such a hot topic, it was like announcing you were a bandito at a hells angel convention.

    Hey Chaco, how did you know it was me, well spotted. I always paid for my accomodation on the trail, don't lump me in with a group from Chicago. I left the US on the 22 Sep and it was not long after that the US suffered its economic meltdown. I think my generous donations at hostels was keeping your economy afloat. With no more money from Daisy you are all being forced to sell your children for medical experiments.

    THe one thing I learnt from the trail was that attitude was everything, and a good sense of humor and not taking oneself too seriously was an absolute must. We experience our lives through the filter of beliefs, especially in hard times and there are many hard times on the trail, and being from another country made me a bit different as pointed out by HnH. These beliefs become a self-fulfilling prophesy as we attract to ourselves the very thing we project outwards about the world.

    I am so sorry for being so provocative, did not expect such a strong response, thought it may have given some people a bit of a wry smile. THis whole discussion reminds me of a time at a shelter that I anounced "eating chickes was unethical." What started as a joke, soon turned into a sceaming match between different groups. I should have learnt my lesson then.

    I think people find it hard to spot satire in an internet forum.
    I am only saying that the group you spent a great deal of time with, boasted about not paying for hostels and the small amount of money they spent on the trail. I didnt mean to single you out.

    Daisy, please please tell your Washington DC story for everyone!!!! I have tried telling a few hikers about it but it just isnt as funny as when you tell it.
    I hope you are well my friend.

  5. #105
    •Completed A.T. Section Hike GA to ME 1996 thru 2003 •Donating Member Skyline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mags View Post
    Another enlightening discussion.

    Here's the the post from a person who works at the ATC:
    https://whiteblaze.net/forum/show...573#post755573


    We want to recognize those who have hiked end to end, although it is not important to us that a hiker passes virtually every one of the 80,000-something blazes. What kind of experience would it be if a hiker was consumed with being "legit" with every step? That's never been part of ATC's view of what the A.T. is for, and it can (although doesn't necessarily) detract from a hiker's ability to really enjoy what's around them. Most at ATC don't view a hiker taking a blue-blazed trail as any great sin.


    Good enough for the ATC...should be good enough for most of you, too.

    Now, go walk damn it. OR just argue..seems to work better for most of you.


    We all take away what we want from Laurie's post back in January. It was a good post.

    For me, I focused on her/ATC's position on doing the "aqua blaze" or skipping a section like Maryland. In those examples, certification would be withheld until the hiker went back and did those or other skips like them. But since this is on the honor system, how many hikers who skip sections actually 'fess up on the ATC application?

    Problem is, there are plenty of hikers who do the aqua blaze (skip the AT, and instead rent a canoe to float between, say, Luray and the VA/WV state line) and/or skip other significant mileage. But the next May, we see their names published in the ATC magazine as if they hiked the whole AT. How many actually go back and hike the AT they skipped before filling out the ATC application? I think many of us guess correctly that they would be a small minority.

    Not that there's anything wrong with skipping the AT in favor of the Shenandoah River. It sounds like it might be a great diversion to hiking in the mountains for six months. But it's hard to justify signing the ATC application if you skip this much AT; at least it would be for me.

    Some can call HYOH, and still more can say it's no one else's business. That could be a valid position. It still irks some of us who actually did the whole AT as it existed at the time of our hikes. Kinda like I think it must piss off legit ex-military who actually served to see imposters walking around in uniform claiming to have served. Not that the two are equal, just that they get similar reactions.

  6. #106
    Super Moderator Ender's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whykickamoocow View Post
    Even after enjoying or probably more accurately suffering through my company for 6 months, do you all still not understand the concept of satire. I did notice that people did start running down the trail in the opposite direction when they saw me coming, or they would hide behind a tree and pretend they could not see me. I must say people were so intense on the trail, and I just had to slightly yank peoples chain to get a massive reaction, where I am from satire, black humor, and sledging are a way of life. Although there were many who had a marvelous sense of humor on the trail, but you were always in great danger if you took me literally, I thought the quip about purple hearts would have been the give away. Purism was always such a hot topic, it was like announcing you were a bandito at a hells angel convention.

    Hey Chaco, how did you know it was me, well spotted. I always paid for my accomodation on the trail, don't lump me in with a group from Chicago. I left the US on the 22 Sep and it was not long after that the US suffered its economic meltdown. I think my generous donations at hostels was keeping your economy afloat. With no more money from Daisy you are all being forced to sell your children for medical experiments.

    THe one thing I learnt from the trail was that attitude was everything, and a good sense of humor and not taking oneself too seriously was an absolute must. We experience our lives through the filter of beliefs, especially in hard times and there are many hard times on the trail, and being from another country made me a bit different as pointed out by HnH. These beliefs become a self-fulfilling prophesy as we attract to ourselves the very thing we project outwards about the world.

    I am so sorry for being so provocative, did not expect such a strong response, thought it may have given some people a bit of a wry smile. THis whole discussion reminds me of a time at a shelter that I anounced "eating chickes was unethical." What started as a joke, soon turned into a sceaming match between different groups. I should have learnt my lesson then.

    So then, Troll it is.
    Don't take anything I say seriously... I certainly don't.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoidfu View Post
    One commonly held opinion amongst the europeans that I've met is that Americans don't get satire, parody, or irony(or even know what irony really is).

    Heh, Ohio St. just came out with a study which shows that a sizeable chunk of a certain party doesn't get the joke about Colbert. They think he's real.

    Keep in mind that when you're dealing with Americans you're dealing with 45% that know stuff, 45% that feel stuff and 10% that don't care.
    Wrong. Only 19 percent know stuff.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ender View Post
    So then, Troll it is.
    Good satre transcends trolling.
    Ender's post is an excellent example of this.

    I love Aussie's, but why they play cricket and how we Canadians managed to dodge that bullet is beyond me.

    Loved the original post by the way.
    Didn't get it until I figured out where he was from.

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    On the news today an American was asked " What do you think about Austrailian Satire, are you ignorant or apathetic?"
    The American replied, "I don't know and I don't care."

    Same for me.
    If you find yourself in a fair fight; your tactics suck.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyline View Post
    Problem is, there are plenty of hikers who do the aqua blaze (skip the AT, and instead rent a canoe to float between, say, Luray and the VA/WV state line) and/or skip other significant mileage. But the next May, we see their names published in the ATC magazine as if they hiked the whole AT. How many actually go back and hike the AT they skipped before filling out the ATC application? I think many of us guess correctly that they would be a small minority.

    Not that there's anything wrong with skipping the AT in favor of the Shenandoah River. It sounds like it might be a great diversion to hiking in the mountains for six months. But it's hard to justify signing the ATC application if you skip this much AT; at least it would be for me.

    Some can call HYOH, and still more can say it's no one else's business. That could be a valid position. It still irks some of us who actually did the whole AT as it existed at the time of our hikes.
    In this case (and I know of some who also biked part of PA as part of their "thru") - then it should be bike your own road or canoe your own river. If you call it HYOH, one assumes you "walked" or are walking.







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    Quote Originally Posted by Homer&Marje View Post
    There all just criminals. Just like us Americans apparently
    My great-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-grandfather, or something like that was living in England back in the late 1700's. In east London to be exact amongst the rookeries of the poor, the living were so crowded there was scarcely room to bury the poor. Tenements stood cheek by jowl, sewers ran into open drains, and armies of rats went foraging in daylight, it all sounds rather similar to the shelters on the AT in the south.

    There were large open pits with rotting cadavers of paupers whose friends could get them no better burial. The disparity between the rich and the poor was enormous, the city was in the throws of the industrial revolution, it created great wealth for the few and poverty for the rest.

    My forebearer stole 2 loaves of bread and a chicken and was sentenced for 14 years to Van Diemens land, modern day Australia. It was considered the arse end of the British Empire. Australia was first established as a penal colony, and remained so for the next 50 years. The worst of the worst were sent down under, no wonder I have not turned out so well. What did my forebearer find in his new prison, surf beaches, open space, endless sunshine, and eternal freedom.

    I guess it could have been worse, if he was a religious fundamentalist he may have then been sent to the US. LOL.

  12. #112

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    It is a bit weird to see somebody stay in town for another day, while you hit the trail, and then you CATCH UP TO THEM in a few days hiking way ahead of you. Makes you wonder what happend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    It is a bit weird to see somebody stay in town for another day, while you hit the trail, and then you CATCH UP TO THEM in a few days hiking way ahead of you. Makes you wonder what happend.
    That happened to me up north all the time, particularly in Maine. With all those ups and downs, some would choose to go into town at an earlier opportunity, I would hike on, over some wind and rained swept mountain. Be totally drenched, get into the hostel and there is my friend who is sitting on a comofrtable couch dry, eating pizza.

    I am glad I hiked the whole trail, but some of the mountains did seem a bit pointless, but that was the challenge, it made the end all the more rewarding for me.

    Plus I had the bonus of walking out of town the next day with a friend.

  14. #114
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAK View Post
    Good satre transcends trolling.
    Ender's post is an excellent example of this.

    I love Aussie's, but why they play cricket and how we Canadians managed to dodge that bullet is beyond me.

    Loved the original post by the way.
    Didn't get it until I figured out where he was from.
    I spent 3 months in Canada after my thru and had the most amazing time, I was really suprised to see how different Canadians were from the Americans. From my observations Canada had more in common with an Austrlaia way off in the pacific than it does to its southern cousin. I travelled to Europe and Asia on the same trip, but it was the US and Canada that were the most thought provoking and confronting, there are many similarites to home, but also many differences. Made me consider the reasons for those differences, I think I learnt more about my own country as opposed to US/Canada.

    Stunning country, and great people, but I think you miss out not playing cricket, rugby, and many other such school sports games. It is great to play sports that other nations are also wrapped up in, then you have great rivalries between nations, and national teams mean so much more to you.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marta View Post
    The sad thing was that I spent a rainy Sunday at the hostel in Glencliffe and heard several NOBOs saying pretty much exactly what you said, and they were serious. Dead serious.

    A number of times I overheard other NOBOs saying rotten things about people they had hiked hundreds of miles with, their supposed "friends," because of various hiking infractions.

    Alas, the original post was pretty much what a few people say, and they mean it. If you search "purism" or "purists" on Whiteblaze, you'll see what I mean.

    I had a similar experience with a northbounder south of Monson. We got to talking and he said that he knew some people that took the Creeper Trail out of Damascus. Then went on to say how the ruined their whole hike because of it.

    I will have to say I met him at the right time. I wasn't an extreme purist, but it was early in my hike and I was trying to see all of the AT. It helped me to realize the error in my ways and helped to to relax a lot. Funny how everytime I really needed it, I ran into someone that changed the way I thought about things.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marta View Post
    The sad thing was that I spent a rainy Sunday at the hostel in Glencliffe and heard several NOBOs saying pretty much exactly what you said, and they were serious. Dead serious.

    A number of times I overheard other NOBOs saying rotten things about people they had hiked hundreds of miles with, their supposed "friends," because of various hiking infractions.

    Alas, the original post was pretty much what a few people say, and they mean it. If you search "purism" or "purists" on Whiteblaze, you'll see what I mean.
    I met 4 SOBO's in mass. and after hiking over 20 miles they set themselves up in the shelter and ate their dinner. Then something amasing happened, as I was eating my dinner and washing it down with a few beers I had hiked in from the last town, these SOBO's started doing an exercise routine. It was all about core stability and upper body strength, a young girl lead them calling numbers out loud 1, 2, 3, 4.....10 HOLD, ok relax, now for some pushups. I stared gobsmacked, I drank the rest of my beer and threw my empty cans at them in disgust.

    They knew how much they weighed, they had calorie controlled diets, started talking some nonsense about vitamins and minerals. The good news is I was influenced by their behaviour, and was concerned about my calorie intake on arrival at the next town, so i had two pints of Ben and Jerrys instead of one.

    Thanks SOBO's.

  18. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by whykickamoocow View Post
    My great-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-grandfather, or something like that was living in England back in the late 1700's. In east London to be exact amongst the rookeries of the poor, the living were so crowded there was scarcely room to bury the poor. Tenements stood cheek by jowl, sewers ran into open drains, and armies of rats went foraging in daylight, it all sounds rather similar to the shelters on the AT in the south.

    There were large open pits with rotting cadavers of paupers whose friends could get them no better burial. The disparity between the rich and the poor was enormous, the city was in the throws of the industrial revolution, it created great wealth for the few and poverty for the rest.

    My forebearer stole 2 loaves of bread and a chicken and was sentenced for 14 years to Van Diemens land, modern day Australia. It was considered the arse end of the British Empire. Australia was first established as a penal colony, and remained so for the next 50 years. The worst of the worst were sent down under, no wonder I have not turned out so well. What did my forebearer find in his new prison, surf beaches, open space, endless sunshine, and eternal freedom.

    I guess it could have been worse, if he was a religious fundamentalist he may have then been sent to the US. LOL.
    Prison life should not be taken for granted or glorified

    SARCASM!!!!!!ALERT!!!!!SARCASM!!!!!!ALERT!!!!!!!

    I would love to spend a few years on the island exploring or doing something. Friend of mine got to spend a year there in college and I was eternally jealous of that. Said the best thing was skydiving in New Zealand over some mountains at sunset.

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  19. #119
    Super Moderator Marta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whykickamoocow View Post
    I met 4 SOBO's in mass. and after hiking over 20 miles they set themselves up in the shelter and ate their dinner. Then something amasing happened, as I was eating my dinner and washing it down with a few beers I had hiked in from the last town, these SOBO's started doing an exercise routine. It was all about core stability and upper body strength, a young girl lead them calling numbers out loud 1, 2, 3, 4.....10 HOLD, ok relax, now for some pushups. I stared gobsmacked, I drank the rest of my beer and threw my empty cans at them in disgust.

    They knew how much they weighed...
    That's awesome. I think I'll carry a scale on my next long hike.

    Another memorable statement from a NOBO met at the Glencliffe hostel was that Ms. Janet had persuaded him to slackpack a section SOBO, and that agreeing to do that had been the biggest mistake of his whole hike.
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

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  20. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by hammock engineer View Post
    I had a similar experience with a northbounder south of Monson. We got to talking and he said that he knew some people that took the Creeper Trail out of Damascus. Then went on to say how the ruined their whole hike because of it.

    I will have to say I met him at the right time. I wasn't an extreme purist, but it was early in my hike and I was trying to see all of the AT. It helped me to realize the error in my ways and helped to to relax a lot. Funny how everytime I really needed it, I ran into someone that changed the way I thought about things.
    How would taking the Creeper out of Dtown ruin someones hike???

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